Now that I have the proper profile, great results

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Thanks for putting up with me guys. I have printeed out about 18 8x10s on different papers and now with the proper profile in my old version of QI I am getting some nice results. Even on my Matte HP paper using the epson matte paper profile. Still waiting on my sample package of paper from RR. I have some Metallic coming I want to see what that does. As far as ink usage it looks like the GO is going down the fastest, then cyan, then magenta.. What do you do for cartridges, do you buy extra of the most used colors or just use from complete sets? I did order some GO cartridges thanks to Joe. I need to use the soft proofing menu more too.

For a printer with small ink cartridges like your R2000 (or my former R2400), I would order enough ink to have 2 spares of each color on hand, and reorder as soon as I had no spares for any color. So when I installed my last spare of some color, I would order 2 of those and 1 of any other colors that only had one spare. I buy ink from Atlex which has good prices and fast delivery. It takes 2 to 3 days for ink to get here. For the 3880 and 7900 that I now have, the cartridges are large enough that I only order ink for those cartridges that are well below half. Enjoy your new printer. Tom

on ebay right now cheap before they disappear. T-shirt printer guys are using the heads from R2000 printers and dumping the OEM ink carts carts dirt cheap. I currently see two sets at $40 each. There have been cheaper sets in the last week or so. They are also selling new headless R2000's for less than $100 if you want a parts machine. Bob P.

I ordered 2 sets for $16 each.. I wonder how long we will see these prices? What a deal. I want to get some larger size paper, waiting on RR. Looking at Satin or Luster finish to use for best quality prints.

Craig wrote: I ordered 2 sets for $16 each.. I wonder how long we will see these prices? What a deal. I want to get some larger size paper, waiting on RR. Looking at Satin or Luster finish to use for best quality prints.
You bought a set for less than the price of one cart! I would keep buying as they pop up... I print on the the RR Arctic Luster and Satin papers, but like the RR Ultra Pro Satin the best. The RR Metallic is ince, but works best with dye inks. You now seeem to have your printing under control, so go and enjoy it! Bob P.

Are the Satin and Luster close? What about the Satin do you like? What type of photography do you do? I shoot mainly people so probably looking for a paper that emulates my lab which is a luster or a very soft gloss. I have a small package of RR polar metallic coming in 8.5x11 to try too. It will probably look like a normal glossy print but the price was right, free.

Craig wrote: Are the Satin and Luster close? What about the Satin do you like? What type of photography do you do? I shoot mainly people so probably looking for a paper that emulates my lab which is a luster or a very soft gloss. I have a small package of RR polar metallic coming in 8.5x11 to try too. It will probably look like a normal glossy print but the price was right, free.
The RR Arctic Polar Luster is just a little more gloss and grain than the RR Arctic Polar Satin. The Ultra Pro Satin (UPS) just has a great look and feel, you will see. I print mostly wedding photos so the UPS works the best for me. RR has occassionaly offered discounts on UPS, watch your emails from them. Bob P.

I dont know if I just sinned or not but I just printed a picture using my HP matte paper, a second try, this time using the ultra prem luster setting profile to see if I could get a bit more sheen with the GO. I only can see a slight difference I made 2 versions of the photo and printed 2 5x7s of the paper, on B&W the other color. There is a tad more detail but the B&W has a bit more tint to it which still looks good. So it my conclusion is the profile didnt change the way the paper printed out. When I turned the printer on and then sent it to print, the printer did a lot of gurnting and graoning for some reason, it took a while before it would print. After it printed I looked at the ink levels and they were don't quite a lot from where they were. I can't believe it just did some cleaning cycle or something.. Is that normal?

When I turned the printer on and then sent it to print, the printer did a lot of gurnting and graoning for some reason, it took a while before it would print. After it printed I looked at the ink levels and they were don't quite a lot from where they were. I can't believe it just did some cleaning cycle or something.. Is that normal?
Yes, my R3000, and the R2000, auto-cleans when it wants to and uses about 5% of the ink in all colors. I have my R3000 about 5 months now and it only ran 2 auto-cleans in the first month and one of them was when I changed from PK back to MK black. I thought my R3000 broke as no auto-cleans for months, and about 700 prints, I was happy that it broke as not to waste ink! Then yesterday it ran an auto-clean, rats! This is why I run great 3rd part inks at one fifth the cost. Once you get up and running with OEM inks, then it is worth looking into 3rd party inks as you don't need to stock certain cartridge colors, just cheap bottles of ink that are always ready to go. Bob P.

I didn't think that the R2000 did an auto clean when you changed from MK to PK ink like the R3000. I know that I changed over once or twice before and it did not do a cleaning cycle. Where does all the used ink go, is that a problem inside the printer as some point? When you say it uses 5% ink you might be right because the cartridge status did show a pretty good size drop. I can't imagine paying full price for these OEM inks, its nuts. If there were not for these cheap cartridges selling and some other 3rd party inks I never would have bothered to print myself.

Craig wrote: I didn't think that the R2000 did an auto clean when you changed from MK to PK ink like the R3000.
You are correct. The R1900 and the R2000 heads have separate channels for PK and MK unlike the many other Printers such as the R2400 R2880 R3000 PRO 3800 / 3880
I know that I changed over once or twice before and it did not do a cleaning cycle. Where does all the used ink go, is that a problem inside the printer as some point?
What? You don't know the dirty little secret? Everytime the printer does a cleaning cycle or ink purge after every single cartridge replacement or EVEN when printing borderless, the ink does indeed go somehere. Into the deep cavern of your R2000 at the very bottom of the printer chasis where the Waste Ink Pads live. There they collect the ink your printer throws away for various maintenace reasons. There is a Waste Ink Counter built into the printer's firmware that keeps track of that and when it reaches an arbitrary FULL condition the printer gets the message, You Printer has Parts that have reached the end of their life!!!!! That's it, the printer will not longer run. It might cost you about $200 to get the pads replaced and the counters reset back to ZERO. It's not just the R2000. ALL printer use this system. Now avoid this disarter, you should have installed an external waste ink bottle to divert and physically catch the waste ink and keep the pads pretty much pristine. Your are no longer pristine. The R2000 is easy to set up for a waste bottle. I am going to be producing a video on the conversion and I also have the software to reset it.
When you say it uses 5% ink you might be right because the cartridge status did show a pretty good size drop.
Then it did run a cycle. Also, Epsons are notorious for not showing any drop of ink levels even after the initial ink charging which will physically use up from 10 to 20% of the cart's inks.
I can't imagine paying full price for these OEM inks, its nuts. If there were not for these cheap cartridges selling and some other 3rd party inks I never would have bothered to print myself.
I once paid $125 for a set and thought I did well!!!!!!! WHich is why before these cheap sets were appearing, I unly used refillable carts and IS inks. Now I am using OCP ( German ) at about 4 cents an ML. But just stick to the OEM carts till they are gone.

jtoolman wrote:
Craig wrote: I didn't think that the R2000 did an auto clean when you changed from MK to PK ink like the R3000.
You are correct. The R1900 and the R2000 heads have separate channels for PK and MK unlike the many other Printers such as the R2400 R2880 R3000 PRO 3800 / 3880
I know that I changed over once or twice before and it did not do a cleaning cycle. Where does all the used ink go, is that a problem inside the printer as some point?
What? You don't know the dirty little secret? Everytime the printer does a cleaning cycle or ink purge after every single cartridge replacement or EVEN when printing borderless, the ink does indeed go somehere. Into the deep cavern of your R2000 at the very bottom of the printer chasis where the Waste Ink Pads live. There they collect the ink your printer throws away for various maintenace reasons. There is a Waste Ink Counter built into the printer's firmware that keeps track of that and when it reaches an arbitrary FULL condition the printer gets the message, You Printer has Parts that have reached the end of their life!!!!! That's it, the printer will not longer run. It might cost you about $200 to get the pads replaced and the counters reset back to ZERO. It's not just the R2000. ALL printer use this system. Now avoid this disarter, you should have installed an external waste ink bottle to divert and physically catch the waste ink and keep the pads pretty much pristine. Your are no longer pristine. The R2000 is easy to set up for a waste bottle. I am going to be producing a video on the conversion and I also have the software to reset it.
You have to be kidding me.. What a scam. why don't they just run the inks empty and get it over with. Waste ink counter? What about people who say they have had their epson 1280 or whatever for 8-10 years. Is it because they are not using them? How hard can it be to replace dirty ink pads? I guess I will not be printing too much Matte paper then if its going to drink ink.. I ran about 5 borderless 4x6 prints maybe that tipped it over the edge to do a cleaning.. haha.. what a joke I just bought another set of cartridges for $16. I received those GO cartridges you showed me, and I bought 2 sets off 2 so I thought they only sent me 2.. I checked the ad again and it has been changed. The picture shows a 2 pack, and the description in the middle of the page says a pack of 2.. I basically paid what I cold have got them for from epson. Pack of 2 for $21.49. I emailed the guy the other day and have not heard a thing yet. Are the inks you are selling dye or Pigment?
When you say it uses 5% ink you might be right because the cartridge status did show a pretty good size drop.
Then it did run a cycle. Also, Epsons are notorious for not showing any drop of ink levels even after the initial ink charging which will physically use up from 10 to 20% of the cart's inks.
I can't imagine paying full price for these OEM inks, its nuts. If there were not for these cheap cartridges selling and some other 3rd party inks I never would have bothered to print myself.
I once paid $125 for a set and thought I did well!!!!!!! WHich is why before these cheap sets were appearing, I unly used refillable carts and IS inks. Now I am using OCP ( German ) at about 4 cents an ML. But just stick to the OEM carts till they are gone.

Any idea how long you have before you need to worry about the waste ink problem?

Craig wrote: Any idea how long you have before you need to worry about the waste ink problem?
That depends on the frequency of Cleaning cycles. If you are a weekend printer, it might take a couple of years. If you are a daily printer then it could be much sooner But unfortunately this particular practice will greatly affect the speed at which your pads will reach the end of their life. Think about the fact that cleanning cycles and printing borderless, generate waste ink. But here is the most overlooked contributor. When you use OEM ink, you load a full set, and that generates a purge cycle. Required to insure the heads have ink in them. You are happily printing when you notice that all your colors are dropping at different rates. The reason is due to the predominant colors in your particular images. Eventually, say the Magenta is declared empty, so you install a new full Magenta. At that point you might also have say, yellow, running low at say 15% from empty. Your printer then runs a purge cycle to load the new Magenta and in doing so, drops all the other colors by an equall amount. The Yellow may now be at 10% with others not too far behind at different levels. After you print a few more big prints the Yellow will reach empty and you replace it. Another purge cycle is performed. Before you know you it you are constantly replacling carts as they reach empty at different rates. It becomes a never ending cycle or cart replacements and Purge cycles = Eventual Full Waste pads One way to beat this to a certain extent is to use refillables carts. Two full sets to be exact. You install a full set, and of course that means an initial purge cycle. As soon as one color runs low, you replace the complete set with the second full one you had on standby. It of course runs a purge cycle but the difference here is that you will have to wait till the next FULL carts is low. You will never get into the Domino Effect situation where you are constantly replacing empty carts every few prints. You will reduce the # of purge cycles by a factor of 7 for your R2000 ( if you factor 8 carts = 8 purge cycles ) The cart set that was removed with the low color as well as 7 others at varying levels can now be refilled to the top, reset, and put on standby till the next time one of your colors is running low. This simple practice will extend the life of your pads well beyold the normal expected life span. If you couple that with the installation of an external waste ink bottle, then you also physically preserve the actual pads. Epson will allow you to download a free utility if you provide the serial # but it only performs a partial reset which will last for only a few prints. The WIC Tool requires you buy SINGLE USE Serial KEYS for $8-$10 a piece. PM me for info

Craig wrote: Any idea how long you have before you need to worry about the waste ink problem?
I don't have your Model printer but my Epson 2200 went over 6 years before I got the message regarding the Ink Pad Status -- end of life. However, I NEVER use Border-less Printing. I am not competing with Walmart since that seems to be their feature for their small (4 x 6) prints. Also, I rarely print 4 x 6 photos. The only size Photos I would print Border-less are 17x25 on the Epson R3880 printer -- but, Border-less is not supported for that size paper. It is supported for 17 x 22 and several other sizes. My reason for desiring to print 17x25 Border-less is so I would not have to trim the borders before Mounting

So borderless uses up more ink and wastes in down the dumper.. I am wondering if I should skip the 5x7 and 8x10 size and order Letter size and just trim them. I would save all the way around.

Craig wrote: So borderless uses up more ink and wastes in down the dumper.. I am wondering if I should skip the 5x7 and 8x10 size and order Letter size and just trim them. I would save all the way around.
The only way a printer can produce a borderless print, is to over print it beyond the print's edges. So by it's nature it has to waste a bit more ink. That's why I NEVER EVER print borderless. Everything I print will be framed. I seldom need to print borderless. Many times a printer will produce artifacts at the trailing edge of a borderless print. In fact Epson covers their BUTT by warning you about that when you choose the borderless option. I could not imagine a final art print on expensive paper being printed borderless and if I show a borderless and one printed with a nice border you can touch and grab without worrying about damaging the image, they will beck the bordered one. But then that is just my very biased oppinion. Joe

Joe, what if you get 8x10 paper and leave a slight border on it, 1/8" if its mounted in a frame is should be covered or if its matted correct? I guess I should buy the 8.5x11 paper for 5x7.s and 8x10s and cut them like I have been doing. When you matte a print the opening is what 1/4 smaller on each side? Why I am asking is because I am going to order some paper.

Craig wrote: Joe, what if you get 8x10 paper and leave a slight border on it, 1/8" if its mounted in a frame is should be covered or if its matted correct? I guess I should buy the 8.5x11 paper for 5x7.s and 8x10s and cut them like I have been doing. When you matte a print the opening is what 1/4 smaller on each side? Why I am asking is because I am going to order some paper.
When I frame a 13x19 without a mat I print it on Qimage witf the default borders. The frame will cover the borders. I often simply print an image cropped to the 13 x19 proportions and leave a nice 1 inch border. The image gets a 3 pixel black border. To me the VERY old fashioned bevel cut matt is simply out of date. I give my customers slightly a different product. Most of them are rather young in the 20-30s and don't really for what we know as traditional. I've even mounted prints onto 1/4" Masonite that has been laquered on bothe sides edges are square cut or routed with slighly round edges ( I have a full machine and woodworking shop in my basement ) The results are different and edgy. Of course If they want traditional, they get traditional. The customer is King / Queen.

Does it make any difference if leaving the printer on for periods of time than shutting it off? Will it waste ink starting up again?

Craig wrote: Does it make any difference if leaving the printer on for periods of time than shutting it off? Will it waste ink starting up again?
Believe me you can not escape the ink waste. It is part of the collateral damage we suffer by choosing to inkjet print. There are those to say turn theprinter off and those who say leave it on. My expereince has been this and I will use one of my PRO 3800s. I had a nagging missing line on my Magenta channel and it would not clear up with either cleaning cycles or printing a full page of Magenta. The cure was to turn it off and so the haed parked on to the caping station. Over night the minor clog was gone. SInce I have 15 printers I think it's smart at least as power saving measure to at least power them down at the end of the day. Does it? I have no clue. Do I get more or less clogged nozzles? Well it seems that I do not get hardly any clogs by powering down at night and up when I am printing ork which is almost daily. Printing daily is really the best preventative.

If I print to a standard size I adjust the print size to leave a little less than a 1/4 inch of white paper inside the mat, slightly larger maigin at the bottom for signature. This allows the texture of art papers to show outside the print area. I submit my work for juried auctions and they require frames and mats for submission. This is also true for most of the galleries I approach for shows. In New England the demographic of the customers who spend real money on art prints (especially non-profit and charity auctions) are older and have significant discretionary income. They're looking for an image that moves them (not just pretty) and is a unique work nobody else has. A well produced art print looks great with an 8-ply archival mat and simple black gaallery frame and the clearest glass you can afford. It's important to know your audience when it comes to presentation. I only sell large art prints, no on-line images. My website's purpose is only to show the catalog of available prints and offer a point of contact for sales. Sal

Vernon D Rainwater wrote:
Craig wrote: Any idea how long you have before you need to worry about the waste ink problem?
I don't have your Model printer but my Epson 2200 went over 6 years before I got the message regarding the Ink Pad Status -- end of life. However, I NEVER use Border-less Printing. I am not competing with Walmart since that seems to be their feature for their small (4 x 6) prints. Also, I rarely print 4 x 6 photos. The only size Photos I would print Border-less are 17x25 on the Epson R3880 printer -- but, Border-less is not supported for that size paper. It is supported for 17 x 22 and several other sizes. My reason for desiring to print 17x25 Border-less is so I would not have to trim the borders before Mounting
The Stylus 2200 was a pretty good printer for it's time. It had some great features that I will later models. Had. It actually had a roll paper cutter accessory that actually worked. I own three of them. The T034 carts are totally refillable and resettable. However, it is one of most difficult ones to get to the ink tubes. You have to litterally locate and snake them from the inside which is almost too difficult to even bother. You can still find used or being given away. I am eyeing another as I type this. The Ink counter can be reset by hand by following a procedure. Or you can use an adjustment program to do the job.

Craig wrote:
jtoolman wrote:
Craig wrote: I didn't think that the R2000 did an auto clean when you changed from MK to PK ink like the R3000.
You are correct. The R1900 and the R2000 heads have separate channels for PK and MK unlike the many other Printers such as the R2400 R2880 R3000 PRO 3800 / 3880
I know that I changed over once or twice before and it did not do a cleaning cycle. Where does all the used ink go, is that a problem inside the printer as some point?
What? You don't know the dirty little secret? Everytime the printer does a cleaning cycle or ink purge after every single cartridge replacement or EVEN when printing borderless, the ink does indeed go somehere. Into the deep cavern of your R2000 at the very bottom of the printer chasis where the Waste Ink Pads live. There they collect the ink your printer throws away for various maintenace reasons. There is a Waste Ink Counter built into the printer's firmware that keeps track of that and when it reaches an arbitrary FULL condition the printer gets the message, You Printer has Parts that have reached the end of their life!!!!! That's it, the printer will not longer run. It might cost you about $200 to get the pads replaced and the counters reset back to ZERO. It's not just the R2000. ALL printer use this system. Now avoid this disarter, you should have installed an external waste ink bottle to divert and physically catch the waste ink and keep the pads pretty much pristine. Your are no longer pristine. The R2000 is easy to set up for a waste bottle. I am going to be producing a video on the conversion and I also have the software to reset it.
You have to be kidding me.. What a scam. why don't they just run the inks empty and get it over with.
Nope I am serious as a heart attack!
Waste ink counter?
The Waste ink Counter is part of the printers firmware.
What about people who say they have had their epson 1280 or whatever for 8-10 years. Is it because they are not using them?
That might be the reason but it all depends on the design of the printer, the size of the pads and how ofter one has to run cleanning cycles. Plus for such an old printer there were free utilities to reset the counter. People would reset them until the ink ink litterally poured out from the bottom of the printer onto your desk
How hard can it be to replace dirty ink pads?
Extremely difficult. You litterally have to disassemble the complete printer to get to them. Only PRO level Epson printers allow you to replace the Waste ink Pads as they are actually part of a so called Chipped Maintenance Tank. Which is a replacable component you can purchase for $20 to $40 depending on the model. Some of the AIO printers like the Artisan series has a hatch underneath the case the you can access the pads to replace them. Resetting is another question. I have not found a good relliable resetter yet.
I guess I will not be printing too much Matte paper then if its going to drink ink..
I don't know what you are talking about. There is no switch of MK to PK or viceversa on the R1900 No waste whatsoever.
I ran about 5 borderless 4x6 prints maybe that tipped it over the edge to do a cleaning.. haha.. what a joke
Auto cleanning occur usually if you shut down the printer for many days, upon powering it on it would likely run a cleaning cycle to make sure you have 100% clear nozzles. I run a nozzle check print every Friday on all 15 of my printers. More often during the heating season. There are two waste ink counters. One keeps track of the liquid ink sucked out during purges and cleaning cycles. The second counter keeps track of the overspray of ink during borderless printing. This ink is absorbed by the foam the runs accross where the paper feeds. If you look directly down inside the printer you will see it.
I just bought another set of cartridges for $16. I received those GO cartridges you showed me, and I bought 2 sets off 2 so I thought they only sent me 2.. I checked the ad again and it has been changed. The picture shows a 2 pack, and the description in the middle of the page says a pack of 2.. I basically paid what I cold have got them for from epson. Pack of 2 for $21.49. I emailed the guy the other day and have not heard a thing yet.
Yes that looks like a bait and switch to me. I tend to just buy mine at Staples must of the time.
Are the inks you are selling dye or Pigment?
I am not selling ink. I sell refillable cartridges for the R2000. Personally, I do use Image Specialists inks which I get from Inkjetcarts. The OCP inks I spoke of had to order directly from Germany. I would have to use OEM GLOP carts in order to achieve minimal gloss defferential but I mostly print only Matte papers so no such problem. If I had known about the cheap OEM cart sets off of EBAY earlier, I would have just used those instead, as nothing really achieves the gloss quality of OEM. But since I print probably 80% matte I do not have to worry about the minor gloss problems of IS or OCP inks. Plus by using these inks, my only real significant cost is the paper. Tomorrow I will send you the samples print, blank paper, image files with Qimage filters, and all the OEM R2000 profiles. Open Qimage and point it to the image folder in the CD. I sent you Screen grabs showning all pertinent settings I used to print the samples. Match those and your prints should match mine. If they do, then you are all set. If they don't them you are doing something different. Joe
When you say it uses 5% ink you might be right because the cartridge status did show a pretty good size drop.
Then it did run a cycle. Also, Epsons are notorious for not showing any drop of ink levels even after the initial ink charging which will physically use up from 10 to 20% of the cart's inks.
PS: I forget to add that a short while after that they will suddenly drop to the real level. Gives you quite a scare.
I can't imagine paying full price for these OEM inks, its nuts. If there were not for these cheap cartridges selling and some other 3rd party inks I never would have bothered to print myself.
I once paid $125 for a set and thought I did well!!!!!!! WHich is why before these cheap sets were appearing, I unly used refillable carts and IS inks. Now I am using OCP ( German ) at about 4 cents an ML. But just stick to the OEM carts till they are gone.

So I will need to consider a waste bottle and reset for the printer at some point down the road. Is it fairly easy to do on the r2000? Just taking off the back screws should get access to the waste tubes? Joe, how come you print a lot of Matte? Do you like the look in B&W better? I am still trying to figure out which paper to order.. I am itching to do a 13x19 to see how it looks. I know I cant go wrong just ordering some Epson paper, either Luster of Satin, but I want to see what the RR looks like. I get good results with the Matte, but on this image compared with my screen and the one I printed out on my HP the skin color has a tad more yellow in it. I am going to make another print and cut back on the yellow in QI about 3 ticks and see it that makes the print more pleasing.

Craig wrote: So I will need to consider a waste bottle and reset for the printer at some point down the road. Is it fairly easy to do on the r2000? Just taking off the back screws should get access to the waste tubes?
The tubes are located on the right side of the printer. I will do a video on it so don't worry about it for the time being. No dange yet.
Joe, how come you print a lot of Matte? Do you like the look in B&W better?
B&W to me should done on Matte or low sheen Satin I think glossy looks cheap but that's my personall view. All final art papers for serious printing are somewhat matte except for Baryta papers which tend to resemble theold wet silver based prints of darkroom days. Like an F surface. My customers all want matte or at the most satin surface paper. RR Ultra PRO Satin is beautiful.
I am still trying to figure out which paper to order.. I am itching to do a 13x19 to see how it looks.
The correct image on the correct paper will allways look stunning in a large size
I know I cant go wrong just ordering some Epson paper, either Luster of Satin, but I want to see what the RR looks like.
The beauty about RR is that you get profiles for your OEM inks and the will print great.
I get good results with the Matte, but on this image compared with my screen and the one I printed out on my HP the skin color has a tad more yellow in it. I am going to make another print and cut back on the yellow in QI about 3 ticks and see it that makes the print more pleasing.
That's beacuse the profile you are using to print onto your HP Matte paper is NOT for your HP Matte paper. I do not have to do ANY adjustments for color balance unless it is something I need to physically change to make the image look better on my monitor before I send it to the printer. If you are having to adjust color one way or another in order to get your prints to look normal to your eyes, then your profiles do not match your paper and inks OR your monitor is still off even though your might think it is not. When you have your monitor set correct and you are using the correct profile then printing is basically idiotproof.

Yeah, the HP matte looks great on some other photos I did, but not this portrait. ? IMAGE(http://dpzen.com/dpzattaches/dpzattachesm/http://3.static.img-dpzen.com/files/g/TS560x560~2372078.jpg) I printed this on epson ultra glossy and it matched my screen, the matte is too yellow in her skin. I think that Ultra Satin from RR sounds like a winner. Man this paper thing can get expensive too covering some bases. I have a print trimmer/cutter which I use on my 8.5x11 paper for 8x10.s and 5x7.s so that helps but its inconvenient. I am surprised they don't offer 12x18 paper.. that seems to be a no brainer since its a 2:3 size like a 4x6. Back to the cartridges and purging every time you replace a cartridge.. Now if the machine has the smarts to tell which one is empty and why not be able to purge that one cartridge instead of dumping whole lot! GEEZ, what a bunch of crooks these MFG.s are. Like I said lots of hidden costs that people dont take into consideration. ?

Craig wrote: Yeah, the HP matte looks great on some other photos I did, but not this portrait. ? IMAGE(http://dpzen.com/dpzattaches/dpzattachesm/http://3.static.img-dpzen.com/files/g/TS560x560~2372078.jpg) I printed this on epson ultra glossy and it matched my screen, the matte is too yellow in her skin.
You do not have a profile for your missmatched HP to R2000 OEM inks! Of course it's going to off. Send me a few sheets of it and I'll make you a profile. It will print neutral then.
I think that Ultra Satin from RR sounds like a winner.
RR ultra pro satin!!!!!! One of my Faves
Man this paper thing can get expensive too covering some bases. I have a print trimmer/cutter which I use on my 8.5x11 paper for 8x10.s and 5x7.s so that helps but its inconvenient. I am surprised they don't offer 12x18 paper.. that seems to be a no brainer since its a 2:3 size like a 4x6. Back to the cartridges and purging every time you replace a cartridge.. Now if the machine has the smarts to tell which one is empty and why not be able to purge that one cartridge instead of dumping whole lot! GEEZ, what a bunch of crooks these MFG.s are. Like I said lots of hidden costs that people dont take into consideration.
You wold pay a fortune for the ability to purge only one color. The TOP level PRO printer can do two colors at a time. The Old HP Z series had three or more preplacable print heads. Like Canon IPGs pro printers. The R2000 is really a consumer / prosumer printer.
?

Craig wrote: Man this paper thing can get expensive too covering some bases. I have a print trimmer/cutter which I use on my 8.5x11 paper for 8x10.s and 5x7.s so that helps but its inconvenient. I am surprised they don't offer 12x18 paper.. that seems to be a no brainer since its a 2:3 size like a 4x6.
For 8.5 x 11 inches and larger, they unfortunately are all fractions or multiples of US office paper sizes. There are very few papers available in standard international A sizes (Moab carries some, for example), and there are a few availalbe in 17 x 25 inches, which is very close to 2:3 (RR does this size and the very unique Harman Gloss Baryta is in this size). Brian A
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jtoolman wrote:
Craig wrote: I didn't think that the R2000 did an auto clean when you changed from MK to PK ink like the R3000.
You are correct. The R1900 and the R2000 heads have separate channels for PK and MK unlike the many other Printers such as the R2400 R2880 R3000 PRO 3800 / 3880
I know that I changed over once or twice before and it did not do a cleaning cycle. Where does all the used ink go, is that a problem inside the printer as some point?
What? You don't know the dirty little secret? Everytime the printer does a cleaning cycle or ink purge after every single cartridge replacement or EVEN when printing borderless, the ink does indeed go somehere. Into the deep cavern of your R2000 at the very bottom of the printer chasis where the Waste Ink Pads live. There they collect the ink your printer throws away for various maintenace reasons. There is a Waste Ink Counter built into the printer's firmware that keeps track of that and when it reaches an arbitrary FULL condition the printer gets the message, You Printer has Parts that have reached the end of their life!!!!! That's it, the printer will not longer run. It might cost you about $200 to get the pads replaced and the counters reset back to ZERO. It's not just the R2000. ALL printer use this system.
You mean all consumer desktop printers? The maintainance tank in my 3880 is user replaceable and only costs $17. The printer warns you when it's getting close to replacement time, although mine is still going strong for almost 3 years. This is the reason, along with tiny ink carts, Epson makes more money in the long-run from desktop consumer printers than their pro models. Sal
Now avoid this disarter, you should have installed an external waste ink bottle to divert and physically catch the waste ink and keep the pads pretty much pristine. Your are no longer pristine. The R2000 is easy to set up for a waste bottle. I am going to be producing a video on the conversion and I also have the software to reset it.
When you say it uses 5% ink you might be right because the cartridge status did show a pretty good size drop.
Then it did run a cycle. Also, Epsons are notorious for not showing any drop of ink levels even after the initial ink charging which will physically use up from 10 to 20% of the cart's inks.
I can't imagine paying full price for these OEM inks, its nuts. If there were not for these cheap cartridges selling and some other 3rd party inks I never would have bothered to print myself.
I once paid $125 for a set and thought I did well!!!!!!! WHich is why before these cheap sets were appearing, I unly used refillable carts and IS inks. Now I am using OCP ( German ) at about 4 cents an ML. But just stick to the OEM carts till they are gone.

Sal Baker wrote:
jtoolman wrote:
Craig wrote: I didn't think that the R2000 did an auto clean when you changed from MK to PK ink like the R3000.
You are correct. The R1900 and the R2000 heads have separate channels for PK and MK unlike the many other Printers such as the R2400 R2880 R3000 PRO 3800 / 3880
I know that I changed over once or twice before and it did not do a cleaning cycle. Where does all the used ink go, is that a problem inside the printer as some point?
What? You don't know the dirty little secret? Everytime the printer does a cleaning cycle or ink purge after every single cartridge replacement or EVEN when printing borderless, the ink does indeed go somehere. Into the deep cavern of your R2000 at the very bottom of the printer chasis where the Waste Ink Pads live. There they collect the ink your printer throws away for various maintenace reasons. There is a Waste Ink Counter built into the printer's firmware that keeps track of that and when it reaches an arbitrary FULL condition the printer gets the message, You Printer has Parts that have reached the end of their life!!!!! That's it, the printer will not longer run. It might cost you about $200 to get the pads replaced and the counters reset back to ZERO. It's not just the R2000. ALL printer use this system.
You mean all consumer desktop printers? The maintainance tank in my 3880 is user replaceable and only costs $17. The printer warns you when it's getting close to replacement time, although mine is still going strong for almost 3 years. This is the reason, along with tiny ink carts, Epson makes more money in the long-run from desktop consumer printers than their pro models. Sal
Now avoid this disarter, you should have installed an external waste ink bottle to divert and physically catch the waste ink and keep the pads pretty much pristine. Your are no longer pristine. The R2000 is easy to set up for a waste bottle. I am going to be producing a video on the conversion and I also have the software to reset it.
When you say it uses 5% ink you might be right because the cartridge status did show a pretty good size drop.
Then it did run a cycle. Also, Epsons are notorious for not showing any drop of ink levels even after the initial ink charging which will physically use up from 10 to 20% of the cart's inks.
I can't imagine paying full price for these OEM inks, its nuts. If there were not for these cheap cartridges selling and some other 3rd party inks I never would have bothered to print myself.
I once paid $125 for a set and thought I did well!!!!!!! WHich is why before these cheap sets were appearing, I unly used refillable carts and IS inks. Now I am using OCP ( German ) at about 4 cents an ML. But just stick to the OEM carts till they are gone.
I said that it did not apply to PRO level printers such as your PRO 3880. I have two PRO 3800 and I have permanently EMPTY chips on my M. Tanks. I replace the sponges with any absorbant material when needed. ALL proffessional printing using Epson PRO printer do their own M. Tank maintenance.

Craig wrote: I can't imagine paying full price for these OEM inks, its nuts. If there were not for these cheap cartridges selling and some other 3rd party inks I never would have bothered to print myself.
Have you compared the cost of paper and ink vs. having a print made? Using the ink cost from Red River's study and paper costs from Red River vs. prints ordered from AdoramaPix gives the following: For 4x6 prints having a print made is a lot less than printing it yourself. Using ink and paper costs from Red River, that 4x6 print will cost about 20 cents for ink and 20 cents for paper. Adorama charges 24 cents for that 4x6 on luster paper. Shop around and you'll find prices under 20 cents each. For the 8x10 prints you are making the story is different. Do it yourself is 67 cents for ink and 40 cents for paper. AdoramaPix charges $1.49 plus shipping. Print an 11x14 and the cost is $1.29 for ink and $0.75 for paper. AdoramaPix will set you back $3.99 plus shipping for that 11x14. 4x6 prints are a commodity item produced on dedicated machines. There is no way to beat that yourself. But for larger prints it is the reverse. Even the R2000, with small cartridges containing expensive ink, will produce lower cost prints with great quality. Red River used retail Epson ink pricing in their study. I used AdoramaPix for the comparison because they have a reputation for very high quality prints. Probably almost the same quality that you can get from your R2000. Tom

I agree to an extent with the costs from the RR web site however there are hidden costs that I dont think they include. Do they include the print head cleaning 5% loss? Do they include making a few copies to get exactly what you want. No I am not perfect, and If I am selling a print I know I will be fussy.. that is going to up the price there. If I was going to print 4x6.s for a customer it would be only a small amount. I have a person who wants about 80 prints, 4x6 and I will just send them out to be made. WHCC charges a lot for 4x6.s too. I cant figure that one out, about .60 each on luster paper.

Craig wrote: I agree to an extent with the costs from the RR web site however there are hidden costs that I don't think they include. Do they include the print head cleaning 5% loss?
In their test they printed 200 8x10s. That is a long enough test to have averaged out any overhead ink usage.
Do they include making a few copies to get exactly what you want. No I am not perfect, and If I am selling a print I know I will be fussy.. that is going to up the price there.
That isn't a factor in this comparison. Any extra prints you make to get it right would apply whether you do it yourself or have someone else do it. Let's say that it takes two tries to get it right. If using an outside service such as AdoramaPix, you would send off the file and wait a few days to get it. Then make any needed adjustments and send it off again. That comes back OK after another few days. So you can then send off the final order in quantity and wait again for a few days. Each of those first two prints will have not only cost time, but would have cost more money than the same two trial prints you could make with your R2000. The issue of the waste tank is another matter. I bought an Epson R2400 when it first came out, nearly 8 years ago. I used it as my only photo printer for all those years until I retired it a few months ago. In all that time, it just worked. I never bothered to do nozzle checks because they were always good. The waste tank message finally came up after 7 years use. I found a resetter program and reset the printer and continued to use it. It takes a very long time for the waste tank to fill. Most people would have replaced the printer sooner than 7 years and thus never encountered the waste ink message. Based on my experience, it was a mystery to me why people worried so much about the waste tank. But then I saw some comments from people using non-oem ink with refillable cartridges. For whatever reason, it appeared that head cleaning used a lot more ink from those cartridges. So perhaps the waste tank issues some people report were related to the refillable cartridges. I doubt the type of ink used would be a factor. But non-Epson ink pretty much implies non-Epson ink cartridges of some type. In any case, I always just used Epson ink and cartridges in my R2400. And I went for 7 years before getting a message about the waste ink. Tom

Tom-C wrote:
Craig wrote: I agree to an extent with the costs from the RR web site however there are hidden costs that I don't think they include. Do they include the print head cleaning 5% loss?
In their test they printed 200 8x10s. That is a long enough test to have averaged out any overhead ink usage.
Do they include making a few copies to get exactly what you want. No I am not perfect, and If I am selling a print I know I will be fussy.. that is going to up the price there.
That isn't a factor in this comparison. Any extra prints you make to get it right would apply whether you do it yourself or have someone else do it. Let's say that it takes two tries to get it right. If using an outside service such as AdoramaPix, you would send off the file and wait a few days to get it. Then make any needed adjustments and send it off again. That comes back OK after another few days. So you can then send off the final order in quantity and wait again for a few days. Each of those first two prints will have not only cost time, but would have cost more money than the same two trial prints you could make with your R2000. The issue of the waste tank is another matter. I bought an Epson R2400 when it first came out, nearly 8 years ago. I used it as my only photo printer for all those years until I retired it a few months ago. In all that time, it just worked. I never bothered to do nozzle checks because they were always good. The waste tank message finally came up after 7 years use. I found a resetter program and reset the printer and continued to use it. It takes a very long time for the waste tank to fill. Most people would have replaced the printer sooner than 7 years and thus never encountered the waste ink message. Based on my experience, it was a mystery to me why people worried so much about the waste tank. But then I saw some comments from people using non-oem ink with refillable cartridges. For whatever reason, it appeared that head cleaning used a lot more ink from those cartridges. So perhaps the waste tank issues some people report were related to the refillable cartridges. I doubt the type of ink used would be a factor. But non-Epson ink pretty much implies non-Epson ink cartridges of some type. In any case, I always just used Epson ink and cartridges in my R2400. And I went for 7 years before getting a message about the waste ink. Tom
Did you use your R2400 in a proffessional environment doing daily photo print jobs? Yes, if you are printing a few prints a week or even less, the waste ink problem will likely never become an issue. I also own and run a R2400 and this particuar model as well as the R2880 have huge waste pads, thus the long period of time you can get away without having to reset the ink counters. I run external bottles on all 15 Printers in my shop and you would be amazed the amount of ink waste on just ink purges which will occur after every single cart exchange ( OEM ) I collect the waste and take it to a loacal disposal place. I do use 3rd party inks on refillables on just about all the printers with hardly a single nozzle clog. Third party inks assuming you are not buying crap from China, and are buying only the best qulity inks are so good as to rival OEM in all categories IMHO. Believe me when I tell you. My print quality will rival anything anyone can show me. I also do run OEM inks which I buy in 220ml or 700ML larger format carts ( Ultrachorme K3 for larger printer ) and use that for refilling my smaller 80ml carts for my two PRO 3800s. I get OEM quality for a lot savings than when using idividual carts. Plus I am not helping fill the local land fill. But to each his own!

JOE?? I have to ask,, why so many printers??

Craig wrote: JOE?? I have to ask,, why so many printers??
Many are dedicated for just one type of print or function,,, and print a lot for many people, for me and my customers. I love the technology and love to take aprinter that maybe beyond it's use and revive them.

$65.96. Need to read the thread from the beginning. Just hope these inks are factory original. Mike

carauction wrote: $65.96. Need to read the thread from the beginning. Just hope these inks are factory original. Mike
Yes they are 100% real

What do you use to ship out your INK Jet prints in? I know the Post office has some stiff card board mailers for maybe up to 11x14 but those can get bent too. Since I can print up to 13x19 how do you protect that size in shipping? Tube? What if you matte it and even frame it? Where do you go for shipping materials?

Craig wrote: What do you use to ship out your INK Jet prints in? I know the Post office has some stiff card board mailers for maybe up to 11x14 but those can get bent too. Since I can print up to 13x19 how do you protect that size in shipping? Tube? What if you matte it and even frame it? Where do you go for shipping materials?
With really small ones, the US postal service ones are better. For larger ones, but less than 24 x 36 inches, I use stay flats from Uline; with the larger of these I use corrugated plastic as a stiffener. Foamcore, matt board, and corrugated cardboard will all snap if bent far enough. With all of the flats, the image is inside an archival sleeve. For 24 x 36 inches or larger I use Uline tubes, with an archival tissue interleave and acid free kraft paper wrap. Packaging nearly always exceeds my printing costs. For local pickup, I will refund packaging returned in a reasonable condition. Brian A

Hugowolf wrote:
Craig wrote: What do you use to ship out your INK Jet prints in? I know the Post office has some stiff card board mailers for maybe up to 11x14 but those can get bent too. Since I can print up to 13x19 how do you protect that size in shipping? Tube? What if you matte it and even frame it? Where do you go for shipping materials?
With really small ones, the US postal service ones are better. For larger ones, but less than 24 x 36 inches, I use stay flats from Uline; with the larger of these I use corrugated plastic as a stiffener. Foamcore, matt board, and corrugated cardboard will all snap if bent far enough. With all of the flats, the image is inside an archival sleeve. For 24 x 36 inches or larger I use Uline tubes, with an archival tissue interleave and acid free kraft paper wrap. Packaging nearly always exceeds my printing costs. For local pickup, I will refund packaging returned in a reasonable condition. Brian A
Thanks for the info. When I received prints from WHCC I just reused their shipping package, plus if I got a decent size order I would get their premium boxes which was a nice touch for about $8 more. I am getting ready to pull the trigger on some RR Ultra Satin papers so I can write it off for this year. What are your thoughts on that paper?

Craig wrote:
Hugowolf wrote:
Craig wrote: What do you use to ship out your INK Jet prints in? I know the Post office has some stiff card board mailers for maybe up to 11x14 but those can get bent too. Since I can print up to 13x19 how do you protect that size in shipping? Tube? What if you matte it and even frame it? Where do you go for shipping materials?
With really small ones, the US postal service ones are better. For larger ones, but less than 24 x 36 inches, I use stay flats from Uline; with the larger of these I use corrugated plastic as a stiffener. Foamcore, matt board, and corrugated cardboard will all snap if bent far enough. With all of the flats, the image is inside an archival sleeve. For 24 x 36 inches or larger I use Uline tubes, with an archival tissue interleave and acid free kraft paper wrap. Packaging nearly always exceeds my printing costs. For local pickup, I will refund packaging returned in a reasonable condition. Brian A
Thanks for the info. When I received prints from WHCC I just reused their shipping package, plus if I got a decent size order I would get their premium boxes which was a nice touch for about $8 more. I am getting ready to pull the trigger on some RR Ultra Satin papers so I can write it off for this year. What are your thoughts on that paper?
I sometimes use RR linen cards, but I don't use any RR papers. I am 95% high end fine art papers. I do very little RC work - I would starve if I had to rely on photo paper prints. Apart from anything else, I don't remember RR doing anything over 17 inches wide. Brian A

Craig wrote: What do you use to ship out your INK Jet prints in? I know the Post office has some stiff card board mailers for maybe up to 11x14 but those can get bent too.
Smaller prints go in flat mailers with heavy Cardboard. One print will end up as a 1/2" envelope.
Since I can print up to 13x19 how do you protect that size in shipping? Tube?
Tubes are the best for large prints but then your customer will have to deal with the curl.
What if you matte it and even frame it? Where do you go for shipping materials?
Then you just have to ship in a box. There is no easy method. 90% of my work is local so I hand deliver.

I use shipping tubes bought in bulk from Staples and standard interleave paper for 16x20 prints. I let the prints dry for several days before shipping and my customers have no problems with curling. I seal the end caps with waterproof strapping tape. Sal

Tom-C wrote:
Craig wrote: I can't imagine paying full price for these OEM inks, its nuts. If there were not for these cheap cartridges selling and some other 3rd party inks I never would have bothered to print myself.
Have you compared the cost of paper and ink vs. having a print made? Using the ink cost from Red River's study and paper costs from Red River vs. prints ordered from AdoramaPix gives the following: For 4x6 prints having a print made is a lot less than printing it yourself. Using ink and paper costs from Red River, that 4x6 print will cost about 20 cents for ink and 20 cents for paper. Adorama charges 24 cents for that 4x6 on luster paper. Shop around and you'll find prices under 20 cents each. For the 8x10 prints you are making the story is different. Do it yourself is 67 cents for ink and 40 cents for paper. AdoramaPix charges $1.49 plus shipping. Print an 11x14 and the cost is $1.29 for ink and $0.75 for paper. AdoramaPix will set you back $3.99 plus shipping for that 11x14. 4x6 prints are a commodity item produced on dedicated machines. There is no way to beat that yourself. But for larger prints it is the reverse. Even the R2000, with small cartridges containing expensive ink, will produce lower cost prints with great quality. Red River used retail Epson ink pricing in their study. I used AdoramaPix for the comparison because they have a reputation for very high quality prints. Probably almost the same quality that you can get from your R2000. Tom
Tom, have you also considered the delivery (or costs to pickup) especially for small quantities. I print my Photos with my Epson Printers but rarely print 4 x 6 photos so the cost information for this size (for me) is irrelevant.

Craig wrote: I ordered 2 sets for $16 each.. I wonder how long we will see these prices? What a deal. I want to get some larger size paper, waiting on RR. Looking at Satin or Luster finish to use for best quality prints.
This "Gold Mine" will dissappear soon. So stock up while you can. I am!!! After these deals are History, you can go with refillables ( I can personally help you with that ) and IS inks plus OEM GLOP carts. That is the only way to come close to the OEM gloss.

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