Eizo monitors?

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Has anyone here heard of Eizo monitors and if so please give your opinion about them. I'm looking at the Ezio cx246 or cs230. All I know is that these may very well may be the top of line monitors with self calibration ability. Any help is appreciated.

alvie wrote: Has anyone here heard of Eizo monitors and if so please give your opinion about them. I'm looking at the Eizo cx246 or cs230. All I know is that these may very well may be the top of line monitors with self calibration ability. Any help is appreciated.

I used to work at a reseller that sold Eizo (along with color mgmt software, printers, etc.) The Eizo was/is the clear choice for calibrated monitors. Before the Eizos it was Barco, but those were $7K monitors!

I have an Eizo S2243W running as a seperate monitor for photo editing only. Comes with its own ESYPIX calibrator. This is a middle of road model for Eizo and ideal for most photograpthic situation. Not as high spec as the CE models but I am very happy with it. Used with custom print profiles I now get most of my photos spot on first try.

I have recently (45 days) purchased an Eizo S2243W-my 'bucket list' monitor! I am a frequent contributor to this forum with extensive experience in the photo arts and sciences. I am embarrassed to admit that I slammed into the brick wall of ignorance regarding the profiling of this fine monitor. After a 'century' of casually profiling my monitors with a Colormunki or Spyder with success, I experienced great difficulty doing so with the Eizo S2243W. I did not realize that the LUT being written to must be the one in the monitor not the video card. I ignored the purchase of the Eizo Spyder sensor because I already owned a pair of sensors, as indicated above. I downloaded and ran the Eizo Sensor software, but the program would not recognize my Spyder3! Only the Match portion of the program would respond--this function is not a profiler--it is a global 'color' touchup for paper write correction. I was unable to profile the monitor per Eizo and my Spyder3. I contacted Eizo tech support, it is an outsourced group of 4 techs; all trying to help but not possessing the indepth technical knowledge surrounding this problem. An engineer from their main office in CA was to contact me and help resolve the problem. It appears that I would have to purchase the Eizo Spyder Sensor to accomplish this task, there must be a tag in the Eizo Spyder their program must recognize or else no go--even though the hardware is the same. I would like to know how you profiled your monitor. You mention the use of custom profiles; where did you place them? In the monitor LUT, the video cart LUT and by what means? In Win7, profiles I create (monitor or printer) are stored in the Win/system32........ directory; and when the PC starts up the default monitor profile is loaded into the video LUT and I'm happy. In my present situation it appears that I'm double profiling--from the video LUT and and the monitor LUT which appear to contain a profile from its initial test-setup. Rather than meander further I'm requesting help from you and the other members of this forum. Thank you irv weiner

irvweiner wrote: I have recently (45 days) purchased an Eizo S2243W-my 'bucket list' monitor! I am a frequent contributor to this forum with extensive experience in the photo arts and sciences. I am embarrassed to admit that I slammed into the brick wall of ignorance regarding the profiling of this fine monitor. After a 'century' of casually profiling my monitors with a Colormunki or Spyder with success, I experienced great difficulty doing so with the Eizo S2243W. I did not realize that the LUT being written to must be the one in the monitor not the video card. I ignored the purchase of the Eizo Spyder sensor because I already owned a pair of sensors, as indicated above. I downloaded and ran the Eizo Sensor software, but the program would not recognize my Spyder3! Only the Match portion of the program would respond--this function is not a profiler--it is a global 'color' touchup for paper write correction. I was unable to profile the monitor per Eizo and my Spyder3. I contacted Eizo tech support, it is an outsourced group of 4 techs; all trying to help but not possessing the indepth technical knowledge surrounding this problem. An engineer from their main office in CA was to contact me and help resolve the problem. It appears that I would have to purchase the Eizo Spyder Sensor to accomplish this task, there must be a tag in the Eizo Spyder their program must recognize or else no go--even though the hardware is the same. I would like to know how you profiled your monitor. You mention the use of custom profiles; where did you place them? In the monitor LUT, the video cart LUT and by what means? In Win7, profiles I create (monitor or printer) are stored in the Win/system32........ directory; and when the PC starts up the default monitor profile is loaded into the video LUT and I'm happy. In my present situation it appears that I'm double profiling--from the video LUT and and the monitor LUT which appear to contain a profile from its initial test-setup. Rather than meander further I'm requesting help from you and the other members of this forum. Thank you irv weiner
Hi, I an not a tech geek so I don't know if I can help you in depth. I got the EIZO EasyPIX software and calibrator included with my S2243W. All in the same box. I believe the EIZO EasyPIX calibrator is a custom version of the Spyder 3. I use a Mac and profiles generated are stored in Displays in System Preferences so may different to your situation. The custom profiles I mentioned are printer profiles that I had made for me by by a professional imaging company and not for the monitor. I am surprised that you did not get the calibrator with the monitor. I thought these monitors and calibrator were sold in kit form. Good luck with your issue.

The Eizo monitors are sold w/wo the Sensor 'stuff', having 2 Sensors already I (ignorantly) did not see the need for another, especially so because I have that Sensor. Your monitor profiling worked because the prgm read the Eizo tag written into the 'Spyder3' firmware. My standard Spyder3 does not have such a tag--thus the profiling portion of the program was not enabled. Further examination of this problem brought me to examine the NEC monitors, they are also sold with a Sensor calibrator prgm--however the extent of features in the NEC Sensor are far richer than that of Eizo. That package appears to be a much better choice--however distracted by my "no need" for another sensor I missed the boat.I downloaded the manuals for both the Eizo and NEC profilers, quite a feature difference. Will most probably negotiate with Eizo for their Sensor or sell (very tempted) the Eizo and purchase the NEC. Thank you for your quick response. irv weiner

I have an Eizo CG222W and think it's great. This is in their ColorEdge series. I am not familiar with the cx or cs series but all the Eizo's seem very good. When I purchased mine I also considered the NEC MultiSync line. Maybe Newsly will give you his views, try the PC Talk forum.

AikenMooney wrote: I have an Eizo CG222W and think it's great. This is in their ColorEdge series. I am not familiar with the cx or cs series but all the Eizo's seem very good. When I purchased mine I also considered the NEC MultiSync line. Maybe Newsly will give you his views, try the PC Talk forum.
Thanks for the info.

I have used the CG222W (Colour Edge) for a couple of years now....could even be nearing 4 years?? I have nothing but praise for the Monitor, have visted with folks who use other Brands of High end monitors and I will stick with this one. I use both iOne and ColorMunki for calibration. I have a number of brightnss presets and profiles so it is immensly adaptable. Also I have no -ZERO dead pixels. Light distribution is truly edge to edge as is colour rendition. I live in a Fire prone area in Australia, so I have had to pack up my gear a few of times and put it in safe storage. That has meant transporting boxed gear over many Kilometers of rough bush roads to safe storage then back again. Fingers crossed, so far no problems, so I am thinking robust too! Finally, I plan to buy a second monitor as they have come down in price from $2500 to around $1600, and that will be an EIZO too. I am in hopes that this is of assistance. Andrew G

AusPic wrote: I have used the CG222W (Colour Edge) for a couple of years now....could even be nearing 4 years?? I have nothing but praise for the Monitor, have visted with folks who use other Brands of High end monitors and I will stick with this one. I use both iOne and ColorMunki for calibration. I have a number of brightnss presets and profiles so it is immensly adaptable. Also I have no -ZERO dead pixels. Light distribution is truly edge to edge as is colour rendition. I live in a Fire prone area in Australia, so I have had to pack up my gear a few of times and put it in safe storage. That has meant transporting boxed gear over many Kilometers of rough bush roads to safe storage then back again. Fingers crossed, so far no problems, so I am thinking robust too! Finally, I plan to buy a second monitor as they have come down in price from $2500 to around $1600, and that will be an EIZO too. I am in hopes that this is of assistance.
Thanks for the info. I guess that's better to pay the high price for good equipment. I'm looking at the CG246 or the CS230 models as seen on you tube.

No experience with Eizo, but I considered it and went with a NEC PA241w instead. It was difficult to believe that the Eizo delivers an important quality advantage of some kind that would justify the wide price gap over the NEC. The NEC displays very nearly all of Adobe RGB. It has been very steady for about 2000 hours now. Here are the CIE (x,y) coordinates at one calibration and at the next one 600 hours of use later: (.673, .311), (.216, .683), (.150, .054) (.676, .309), (.221, .679), (.150, .053) with a maximum grayscale Delta E of 1.17, achieved contrast 204:1 versus target 200:1 And I get excellent prints using paper manufacturer profiles to guide an Epson R2880.

I have the CG245W self calibrating model - expensive but fantastic!

I have a CG241 for several years now. It was about 2100€ when it hit the market. I came from a NEC IPS 2180 screen, the EIZO is S-PVA. The viewing angle was greater with the NEC, but the backlight was not as homogene as the EIZO. The EIZO is also stronger in the contrast. First the lower viewing angle was a bit confusing to me, especially in darker areas, but the more I used the screen the more I loved it. Later there was CG273 that was IPS and I nearly bought it. Good luck I saw it next to a CG241, both hardware calibrated, both showing the same image. I keept my 241, cause it had somewhat more punch, more 3D effect. Now there is a CG245, but the 241 is still available at EIZO. This monitor has a large gamut and contrast, not much less as the most actual displays. By the way, the color is very faithfull! Maybe I upgrade to a CG276 soon, but in my eyes you can´t go wrong with EIZO! Something to NEC: Bought the 2180, new, but opened box (had´nt bought it if I had´nt drive about 260km to get it!) !?!?! I found 7 bad pixels! Called NEC for exchange. The new monitor had 1 bad pixel that changed with the displayed picture. The next thing was that this monitor went on even when the computer was off, several times a day :-(! The third monitor was quite fine, only 1 bad pixel. It went strong till I bought the EIZO, but homogenity was always a problem. I also had a NEC 1550x that died short after warranty ran out. Think I stick with EIZO since the ColorNavigator Software is also great!

I have bought an Eizo s2243w monitor and profiled it with my Colormunki as I have done with all my other monitors in the past. Viewing my standard Datacolor test image indicated peaking in the bright red and bright green regions. Gray scale was clean and B&W images were fine. I repeated the profiling several times and ditto using the Spyder3, but the results did not change. I was ignorant that Eizo profiling wrote to the LUT in the monitor, not the video card. I noted that the Spyder used in the Eizo sensor appeared identical to my Spyder3, so I ran the Eizo software with my Spyder3--but it was not recognized. The only mode available was the Match mode, this allowed a Global correction with the Color wheel to adjust the 'paper' color--not profile. Rather than spend $200 for another Spyder I would like to know how any here profiled their Eizo s2243w monitor (or similar) without using the Eizo/Spyder gear. I believe I am now double profiled--the factory profile in the monitor LUT and my profile in the video card LUT. Please refer to my earlier posting describing this situation in more detail. Still waiting for assistance from Eizo Corp engineering to respond. Thank you, irv weiner

For Irv I looked briefly at the Eizo site and did not see that your S2243W has an internal LUT. Maybe I over looked it. If it does not then your calibration is thru the video card. The info I am adding now is from my setup and you might get some helpfull info. Win 7 64 bit with Nvidia GeForce GTX 570 and dual monitors. ColorMunki Photo with the ColorMunki softwarre. Eizo ColorEdge CG222w which does have internal LUT and Eizo Color Navigator software Dell 2209wa monitor. I had read in several articles that you could not have two color mgt programs on the same machine. I wanted to use the Color Navigator software to calibrate the LUT internal in the Eizo monitor and the C/M software to calibrate the 2209 thru the video card. I did not know if this would work or how to do it. I called Eizo and talked to a very knowledgeable rep. He walked me thru it and then e-mailed me the same info. To calibrate the Eizo using C/N you first go to Control Panel in Win 7 and find X-Rite Device Services (32 bit) and uncheck the ColorMunki box. Close Control Panel and then open Color Navigator. By unchecking the box that allows the C/N software to see the C/M Photo. Calibrate and profile the Eizo. At this point you can go in and recheck the box or reboot which will do the same thing. Now I open the ColorMunki software and calibrate and profile the Dell. They look very close. I have been doing this since Aug 2010 with no problems. This info was not on the Eizo site at the time and I do not know if it has been added. Good luck, hope this helps.

AikenMooney wrote: For Irv I looked briefly at the Eizo site and did not see that your S2243W has an internal LUT. Maybe I over looked it. If it does not then your calibration is thru the video card.
Hello, From the FlexScan S brochure it appears the S2243W has a 10-bit LUT, but can it be accessed "from outside"?: http://www.eizo.com/global/support/db/files/catalogs/lcd/FlexScan_S_Series.pdf (the SX series being 16 bit). Would the difference be significant, for someone on a (not extremely tight) budget? I would have yet another question (sorry, it seems I lack in the "answer" department): in order to calibrate using the internal LUT (if present), do I need a vendor specific solution, e.g. Eizo's Color Navigator, or would it work with a generic, e.g. Spider's software? I'm asking because it appears Color Navigator, while it supports the Spider3&4 device, it would only work with some of the CG series Eizo monitors. I hope I'm mistaken, or that there are alternatives. Thanks, Alex

I have the CG223W and the older CG19 and both perform very well. The built in hardware calibration and software provided do a very good job in calibrating and profiling these displays. I use the ColorMunki for the sensor. I like the capability to totally control the display properties including the black point. This means that my photos always look the same with time as equipment changes.

I have an Eizo Flexscan S2110W. I know it's not a premium grade monitor but I was surprised to find that, shortly after going out of warranty, soft edged vertical areas of the screen in the centre and at the edges have become yellowish. This is only really visually apparent on a plain white screen but must affect my colour judgement on images. It does not appear to be the backlight but the panel that is at fault as the effect vanishes when the panel is viewed from the side. Eizo seem to agree but the cost of repair and shipping probably exceed the cost of a replacement. I never had a CRT go bad (nostalgic tear wells up).

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